Categories
Events

100 Years Strong – Time to Celebrate!

Join us for the League’s birthday celebration! The League is 100 Years old on Feb. 14, but we’re celebrating all year long!

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Photo by fotografierende on Pexels.com

 After one hundred years of struggle, women finally received the national vote in 1920. We are celebrating the ratification of the Nineteen Amendment and the birth of our League of Women Voters organization.

Please join us on Saturday, March 7th at the Salem Convention Center from 10AM to 2PM for a memorable luncheon and panel discussion moderated by former Governor Barbara Roberts. We are tremendously honored to have confirmed panelists who are women leaders currently serving in Oregon: Governor Kate Brown (invited), Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, Labor Commissioner Val Hoyle, Supreme Court Chief Justice Martha Walters, and Metro President Lynn Peterson. 

A special video created for the event as well as a slideshow featuring archival state and local League photographs will be presented. 

The Carrie Chapman Catt and Distinguished Service Awards will be announced along with the Distinguished Service honorees, those chosen by their local Leagues for outstanding service to our communities. 

So much has been achieved in the last 100 years! We are thrilled to invite you, your family and friends for this once-in-a-lifetime event. We sincerely hope you will attend. 

The deadline to register is Feb. 28. Click here to register and order a lunch.

Nineteenth Amendment background from our documents.gov.

The 19th amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle; victory took decades of agitation and protest. Beginning in the mid-19th century, several generations of woman suffrage supporters lectured, wrote, marched, lobbied, and practiced civil disobedience to achieve what many Americans considered a radical change of the Constitution. Few early supporters lived to see final victory in 1920.

Beginning in the 1800s, women organized, petitioned, and picketed to win the right to vote, but it took them decades to accomplish their purpose. Between 1878, when the amendment was first introduced in Congress, and August 18, 1920, when it was ratified, champions of voting rights for women worked tirelessly, but strategies for achieving their goal varied. Some pursued a strategy of passing suffrage acts in each state—nine western states adopted woman suffrage legislation by 1912. Others challenged male-only voting laws in the courts. Militant suffragists used tactics such as parades, silent vigils, and hunger strikes. Often supporters met fierce resistance. Opponents heckled, jailed, and sometimes physically abused them.

By 1916, almost all of the major suffrage organizations were united behind the goal of a constitutional amendment. When New York adopted woman suffrage in 1917 and President Wilson changed his position to support an amendment in 1918, the political balance began to shift.

On May 21, 1919, the House of Representatives passed the amendment, and 2 weeks later, the Senate followed. When Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment on August 18, 1920, the amendment passed its final hurdle of obtaining the agreement of three-fourths of the states. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the ratification on August 26, 1920, changing the face of the American electorate forever.

 

Categories
Events Program Publications

League DEIS Comments – No On LNG

The League of Women Voters of Rogue Valley (LWVRV) joined the LWVs of Coos County (LWVCC), of Umpqua Valley (LWVUV), and of Klamath County (LWVKC) in writing a letter to Oregon Governor Kate Brown, conveying key concerns about how the Jordan Cove Energy Project would conflict with the work Oregon has ahead of us to meet the challenges of climate change.No-LNG

This same letter was then forwarded to FERC as comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) on the Jordan Cove Energy Project.

This is how the letter begins….

Dear Ms. Bose:
We write representing the League of Women Voters of Coos County (LWVCC), LWV of Umpqua Valley (LWVUV), LWV of Rogue Valley (LWVRV), and LWV of Klamath County (LWVKC). We are grassroots nonpartisan, political organizations operating in the four counties in Oregon that would be directly affected by the construction and operations of the proposed Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas (JCLNG) and Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline (PCGP), commonly referred to collectively as the Jordan Cove Energy Project (JCEP). Our detailed review of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for this project shows that the projects are in direct conflict with many of the state and national League of Women Voters positions. These positions are based on study documents and consensus evaluations regarding natural resources, water quality and air quantity, climate change, offshore and coastal management, land use, public health and safety, energy conservation, and seismic risks

READ More of this credible work — the PDF is here.

Categories
Events

Co-sponsoring a Suffrage Quilt!

The Umpqua Valley League has joined with the Umpqua Valley Quilter’s Guild as a silver sponsor for the 2020 Quilt Show to be held on April 24, 25 & 26, 2020. Our membership is very excited about this!

Here’s a photo from a poster showing a Suffrage Quilt from 1992.

Categories
Action

NPV

National Popular Vote.

Call your legislators! The following are excerpts from our Legislative Reports that the League of Women Voters of Oregon produces each week and their website.

paul-dufour-500191-unsplashThanks to all who responded to the NPV Action Alert.

Please keep the pressure on legislators to vote yes on SB 870. We are seeing nationwide momentum for election reform, which includes an acknowledgement of the flaws in our Electoral College system. It’s especially important to provide Oregon’s Republican legislators with facts (LINK to Answers to Common Questions about National Popular Vote) to counter the partisan myths about NPV.

Here’s a sampling of NPV news from around the country:

  • Delaware, 3 electoral votes. On March 7, the NPV bill passed the Delaware Senate on a bipartisan vote and is now headed to the House for likely passage. The governor has indicated he will sign it. This just happened.
  • New Mexico, 5 electoral votes. We await news from where the bill sits in the Senate Rules Committee after passage in the House.
  • Maine, 4 electoral votes. There are high hopes for as the legislature’s Veterans and Legal Affairs Committee recently voted 6-3 to endorse NPV on a party line vote.
  • Colorado, 9 electoral votes. The NPV bill awaits the governor’s signature . Opponents have threatened to put a popular referendum on the ballot to attempt a reversal.

Eleven Democratic-leaning states and the District of Columbia already have voted to enter the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. Democrat-controlled Colorado will soon join the list, giving the compact 181 of the 270 electoral college votes needed to elect the president.

In Oregon, SB 870, the Senate version of the National Popular Vote Bill, was introduced on February 25 with an unprecedented 40 sponsors and 8 chief sponsors. This is the same bill that has been blocked by Senate leadership after passage in the House four times in recent sessions. However, we are very hopeful that this year will be different.

NPV supporters have just been told that Senate President Courtney and Senator Ginny Burdick are finally willing to allow a Senate vote on the NPV bill this session. It is important that legislators hear from as many constituents as possible that support for NPV is high. Please call or email your state legislators as soon as possible to urge support for SB 870.

Check the National Popular Vote website for the latest updates.

Call your legislators!

Categories
Program

Redistricting Forum Round 2

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You are invited to an educational forum about Redistricting, AKA Gerrymandering.

If you would like to know more about this important subject that affects every election, please attend.

Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019
1:30 to 3:30 PM
Roseburg Public Library
1409 Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg, OR
South Umpqua Room

Here’s a link to a PDF that will fill you in about how/why it’s done in Oregon.

Link to why we do redistricting all over the country. It’s all about the national census that will take place in 2020, making the next census critical to redistricting done in the following year, 2021.

Here’s a great link to the Brennan Center information on the subject.

Please plan on attending this interesting meeting. The state League of Women Voters of Oregon will present a compelling case. Let’s hear from you, too!

This meeting is open and free to the public. Refreshments will be served.

For more information, email lwvuv.info@gmail.com or call [541] [672] [6982].

Categories
Action

The League and No LNG

The state League of Women Voters of Oregon, along with four local Leagues, Rogue Valley, Klamath Falls, Coos County, and Umpqua Valley, submitted comments on August 15, 2018 requesting denial of all permitting applications.1532567086475

The League of Women Voters of Oregon —

 “believes that natural resources should be managed as interrelated parts of life-supporting ecosystems. Resources should be conserved and protected to assure their future availability. Pollution of these resources should be controlled in order to preserve the physical, chemical and biological integrity of ecosystems and to protect public health.” The League of Women Voters of Oregon (LWVOR) “. . . opposes degradation of all of Oregon’s surface and ground water. . . .” and declares that climate change is the greatest environmental challenge of our generation. 

We must protect the natural resources we have now. We must stand in solidarity!

Please read the League’s complete comments here.

 

Categories
Publications

Voters’ Guides Are Here!

Get your nonpartisan, unbiased Voters’ Guide from a League friend or contact us. We have limited paper copies.

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Here’s a link to the electronic version of the paper Voters’ Guide:
http://lwvor.org/home/voteresources/

What does nonpartisan mean?

We do not support or oppose and political candidates or parties. Period.

Categories
Events Program

Another Chance to Learn About #M101

Thank you for attending today’s public forum on Ballot Measure 101. Oregonians will vote on this measure on Jan. 23’s special election.

Please see our photos from today’s forum at the Umpqua Valley Arts Association in Roseburg. Presenters were Anna Willman and Rick Staggenborg, League members.

If you missed today’s very informative forum that explained both YES and NO sides of the measure, you have another chance to attend a similar forum in early January in the evening. Look for more information about this upcoming event.

The Arts Center has a display of handmade ceramic cups free to Veterans now available.  See photo. Cups artist is Ehren Tool. For more information see their main webpage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a link to a one-page PDF that summarizes the effects of the measure.

The measure’s title is “Approves temporary assessments to fund health care for low-income individuals and families, and to stabilize health insurance premiums. (Referendum Order by Petition of the People)”.

Download or view the measure in PDF form here.

Here’s a link to the state League’s Voters’ Guide.

Election Day is Jan. 23. Get your ballot in. The last day to register to is Jan. 2nd. Get Registered! Call the County Clerk’s office for more information — 541-440-4252.

Categories
Events

Member Social Dec. 12

All LWV Umpqua Valley members are invited to attend a special Member Social on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017 at 5PM to 7PM the Unitarian Church on Watters Street in Roseburg.

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There will be social and networking time, refreshments, introductions, a short video, and a short PowerPoint presentation about the history of our local League. Your photo may be in it! Also, we will visit League websites online and Oregon Legislative Information System (OLIS).

Come for fun! Bring a friend who might like to learn more about the League.

Please RSVP by calling 541-672-1914.

 

Categories
Events

Religious and Cultural Diversity

Religious and Cultural Diversity

… As seen through the eyes of 3 Muslim, Hindu, and Christian exchange students

Roseburg, Ore., Nov 21st, 2017 — The Umpqua Valley chapter of the League of Women Voters will present a program on Religious and Cultural Diversity on Tuesday, November 21st, from 7:00 to 8:30 pm, at the Umpqua Valley Arts Center, 1624 W Harvard Ave, Roseburg. This meeting is open to the public.

Do you know which country is the 2nd most populous country iGlobe with Flagsn the world, and where Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism all originated? Which country is comprised solely of islands, and is the world’s largest Muslim-majority nation? Which country has the world’s only city that spans two continents? What does it mean to be a devout Hindu? How do Muslims, Christians, and members of other religions interact in Indonesia? How does it feel to be an American Christian living in a majority Muslim country?

If these questions interest you, you’re invited to attend a presentation on Nov 21st hosted by the League of Women Voters Umpqua Valley about religious and cultural diversity. The program will feature two of our exchange students who are in Douglas County as part of the State-Dept. sponsored Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) program. Also featured will be a U.S. person who went on an AFS exchange to Turkey in 1991.

Presenters will be: Akhilesh Jhawar, 17 year-old student from Kolkata, India, who is currently a senior at Sutherlin High School; Akhilesh is passionate about quantum physics and hopes to be an astronaut someday – last year, his school team from Kolkata won a space shuttle settlement design contest and received an all-expense paid trip to NASA.

Refina Puspita is also a 17 year-old student; she hails from Kalimantan, Indonesia, and is a senior at Roseburg High School. Refina has placed on her country’s debate team, and her passions are history, political science, and writing fiction.

And Amy Nash, a student from Roseburg, who went on exchange to Turkey after graduating high school, and can describe the cultural and religious interactions that she had.

Please attend and bring a friend.